Tech, Trends

Dyson’s air-purifying headphones are the latest fad

Like a breath of fresh air.

words by: Sahar Khraibani
May 11, 2022

Zone air-purifying Bluetooth headphones with visors are now available from Dyson. Dyson has unveiled its first wearable device, a pair of Bluetooth noise-canceling headphones that combine the company’s air purification technology with a design aimed at city inhabitants who want to avoid contaminated air.

 

The Dyson Zone is unlike anything else the company has done before, and it’s bound to raise some eyebrows. It’s a pair of giant, fluffy headphones with a plastic mask-like apparatus that links from ear to ear across the wearer’s mouth and appears like something from a science fiction film. It uses active noise cancellation technology to give filtered air to the mouth and nose while also combating noise pollution.

 

Jake Dyson, the chief engineer, said:

“Air pollution is a global problem – it affects us everywhere we go. In our homes, at school, at work and as we travel, whether on foot, on a bike or by public or private transport. The Dyson Zone purifies the air you breathe on the move. And unlike face masks, it delivers a plume of fresh air without touching your face.”

 

The design

Each ear cup contains a motor, a compressor fan, and an air-purifying dual-layer filter. The air is filtered to remove 99% of particles as small as 0.1 microns — such as pollen, bacteria, and dust, as well as gas pollutants like sulfur and nitrogen dioxide. The filtered air is then forced through the interior of a visor that sits just in front of the mouth and nose without touching the skin, providing a pocket of clean air for the wearer to breathe.

 

The headphones feature sensors that detect how fast the wearer is moving and automatically alters the airflow between 3 intensity levels to deliver up to 5 liters of clean air per second, similar to a jog. An air quality sensor in the left ear cup measures real-time pollution levels and sends the information to a smartphone app, which tells you when to replace the filters, which should last approximately 12 months in Europe or less in more polluted areas.

 

The visor includes size-adjustable arms and is coupled to the headphones by magnets that can be unclipped or loosened, allowing the wearer to communicate to people while pausing the fans. Dyson also offers a separate mask attachment that sits between the visor and the face, with an FFP2 filter designed in response to COVID-19 masking regulations.

 

Meanwhile, active noise cancellation technology, which is similar to that found in Bose, Sony, and other popular commuter headphones, uses microphones to monitor ambient noise and rotating compressors on either side of the wearer’s head to remove it using anti-sound waves fed into the ear cups. By removing the visor, the headphones can be used without filtration.

 

The battery is only meant to be used for brief periods of time, lasting up to 4.5 hours at the Zone’s lowest purification rate or 90 minutes at maximum. They last up to 40 hours when used solely as headphones, charge to 60% in 20 minutes via USB-C, and may be used while charging if necessary.

 

The Dyson Zone will be available in the fall, and though its price is not yet set, it is believed to cost anywhere between $600 to $1,300. You can read the full story on dyson.com and sign-up to be notified when they go live.

 

For now, here’s where to turn if you want noise-cancelling headphones.

 

Photo via Dyson